What Makes a Great (Native or Non-Native Speaking) English Teacher?

I think that this discussion is very educational.
I continuously have been questioning who is a better teacher, native speaker or non-native language teacher?
I have been teaching Polish as well as English for over 40 years.
As a Native Polish speaker, I have been a lot more stressed out teaching English because I always have felt a bit behind new expressions, phrases, vocabulary, and so on
I agree with James Alvis Carpenter’s thinking:
“ What does it mean to be an English teaching professional? Is it the ability to speak English? The ability to teach English? The professional credentials attendant to both? Or a combination of tangible and intangible elements—like the ability to speak English coupled with the ability to think creatively and connect with people from different cultures? ”
I believe that, generally speaking, it does not matter if you are a native or not – native speaker.
The most important is to be a good creative teacher, with a competence to motivate students to learn a language.
Passion for teaching, friendly attitude towards learners, love of the subject, a readiness to alter, a willingness to give, support and reflect are vital education skills.
Above all, it is essential to be a lifetime learner, so to constantly look for the best ways of improving teaching methods. We should take courses to master teaching techniques.
I have been taking many courses, just recently;
Teaching with Technology
Learn to Blend and Flip your Classes with Technology
Run Dr. Nellie Deutsch (Ed.D) on WizIQ
https://www.wiziq.com/course/92339-teaching-with-technology

We should remember about collaboration, cooperation as well as understanding and encouraging students.
Criticizing and keeping strong discipline is not advisable.
A good teacher respects students, makes a sense of community, is warm, available, loving and caring, but at the same time sets high expectations for all students.

EnglishCentral: The Official Blog

two-people-talking-face-to-face

Chad is an American in his early twenties. He completed a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, but didn’t know what to do with his life after graduation. He got average grades in college, is reasonably smart, but lacks marketable skills. His choices after graduation are entry-level positions at a few local companies, but he doesn’t want to sit at a desk all day. Eventually, Chad hears about a friend who’s working as an English teacher in Japan. According to this friend, the salary is good, the women are beautiful, and the job is easy.

“Do you need teaching experience to get a job like that?” Chad asks his friend.

“No,” his friend replies. “You just need to be a native speaker of English.”

Chad is eventually hired in a similar school in Japan. He begins teaching classes. He is called “teacher.” He comes up with creative ideas for how to teach his…

View original post 954 more words

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s