Why digital citizenship is important

Originally posted on :

Are you busy preparing new content and learning experiences for your students?  If you are, never miss the opportunity to include digital citizenship in relation to online environments.

This video cleverly highlights the scary truth about how much personal information is available about those who are not careful. A fun way to make a point!

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Longreads’ Best of WordPress, Vol. 7

Longreads’ Best of WordPress, Vol. 7.
10 of our favorite stories from across all of WordPress.

Posted in online, language, education, teaching, methods, online, learning, lesson materials, blog, telling | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Longreads’ Best of WordPress, Vol. 7

halinakasia:

Wonderful collection of fantastic stories.

Originally posted on WordPress.com News:

Here it is! A new collection of our favorite stories from across all of WordPress.

As always, you can find our past collections here. You can follow Longreads on WordPress.com for more daily reading recommendations, or subscribe to our free weekly email.

Publishers, writers, you can share links to your favorite essays and interviews (over 1,500 words) on Twitter (#longreads) and on WordPress.com by tagging your posts longreads.

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Myths about the brain ‘hamper effective teaching’

Myths about the brain ‘hamper effective teaching’.

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Myths about the brain ‘hamper effective teaching’

Research published today suggests that widely believed myths about neuroscience are being used to justify classroom practice that has “no educational value”

Moral maze: advances in neurosurgery are often the result of risk-taking

90 per cent of teachers in the UK believe students are either left brained or right brained Photo: Alamy

The study, published today in Nature Reviews Neuroscience, began by presenting teachers in the UK, Turkey, Greece, China and the Netherlands, with seven myths about the brain and asked them whether they believed the myths to be true.

According to the figures, over half of teachers in the UK, the Netherlands and China believe that children are less attentive after sugary drinks and snacks and over a quarter of teachers in the UK and Turkey believe that a pupil’s brain will shrink if they drink fewer than six to eight glasses of water a day.

Furthermore, over 90 per cent of teachers in all countries believe that a student will learn better if they receive information in their preferred learning style – auditory, visual, kinaesthetic. This is despite the fact that there is “no convincing evidence to support this theory”.

Dr Paul Howard-Jones, author of the article from Bristol University’s Graduate School of Education, said that many teaching practices are “sold to teachers as based on Today’s research has suggested that erroneous ideas about neuroscience could be “hampering” efforts by neuroscientists to communicate the actual findings of their work to teachers. neuroscience”.

Today’s research has suggested that erroneous ideas about neuroscience could be “hampering” efforts by neuroscientists to communicate the actual findings of their work to teachers.

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Why use technology?

halinakasia:

Using technology in the classroom…

Originally posted on Teaching Knowledge Test Prep:

Ah yes here is one of the thought provoking posts that I like to send out to you every so often. Through my twitter network of supporters, teachers and learners, I found this great commentary and review on an article which was published in the NY Times not too long ago. Check it out.

Collision Detection

It explains in clear language how technology enhances learning, and demonstrates different ways of applying wordles in academic situations, even in a second language classroom!

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USA behind China. Russia take benefits

USA behind China. Russia take benefits.

“A lot of analysis say that China will maintain growth in next years which is crucial for Russia”

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USA behind China. Russia take benefits

halinakasia:

This is my student’s blog.

Originally posted on Jacob Thoughts on Economy:

In its latest annual report IMF said that China will have bigger GDP than USA during 2014 calendar year. China’s GDP is still smaller than USA when counted in raw dollars, but it’s bigger, if we account it for purchasing power parity. PPP is becoming a standard in comparing country’s GDP.

A lot of analysis say that China will maintain growth in next years which is crucial for Russia

In may Gazprom and CNPC had singed a 30-years gas supply contract from Russia to China which is worth 400bln USD. China will pay 350 USD with annually delivery of 38bln cubic meters of gas.

If Russia strengthen it’s cooperation with China and other Asian’s markets(which is very possible), gas prize for Eastern Europe countries will be rising and Russia will be more independent with no response from second side.

http://cf.datawrapper.de/jHB1L/4/

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